River History

We take local residents on a bus tour, discussing the history of the people and environment along the river. The stories are gathered and kept as a record of what has happened in the area.

Map of the residents of Killara  Download Pdf  2.2 mb

 

Fourth History Tour

On Sunday 2nd Dec, Friends of the Glenelg River held their final history tour for 2007. This was quite different from our other history tours as the group walked instead of travelling by bus.

The tour started at the Stock Bridge and ended at ‘Clay Banks’ (just upstream from the footy scoreboard) followed by a quick lunch and video at the Footy clubrooms.

As usual, the group was led by local historian, Graeme Baugh with the whole event filmed by Des Wombwell.

Some of the stories that were told on the day included the 1910 drowning of John Richardson. Helen Carney attended the walk (with her daughter and grand daughter) and told more about John who was her Great Great Grandfather. John is credited with being the first European settler in Casterton.

Other stories were about George Jelly a local Casterton hero who died in 1896; the 1920 drowning of a schoolboy after the collapse of the suspension bridge; the life of Richard (Dick) Kropinyeri, a local aboriginal man who lived in a humpy on the river bank near the bowling greens, dying at the age of 46 in 1969; the ‘Egg’ hole and ‘Clay Banks’.

Graeme also presented the story of the formation of the Island Park recreation reserves (see story below for more)

Tim Burnard, Chairman of Friends of the Glenelg River said that Graeme’s knowledge of our local history is very impressive and we are very much indebted to him for another great outing.

Tim also said that the group is now compiling all of Graeme’s work and the tapes filmed by Des to ensure that the stories are retained for future reference. Friends of the Glenelg River hope to gather up the stories told and put them into a small publication that can be built upon as we get more detail.

Third history tour

On Sunday 24 June 2007, another 20 people headed off from Rotary Park to share stories about the Glenelg River. This tour was quite different from the previous tours because instead of a bus, we had a tag-a-long 4WD tour. This was mainly because of the expectation of wetter conditions, but also to allow the party to get into places that the buses could not.  The last tours looked at the Killara and Wilkin regions; this time the focus was on the Bahgallah/ Sandford area, in particular, following the trail of Major Mitchell.

First stop for the tour was at Major Mitchell’s’ monument on the Casterton-Sandford Rd, followed by a site east of Sandford with a beautiful

old bridge providing the only access to the ‘Island’ farm. Next stop was the Mocamboro trig point and nearby lookout above ‘Runnymead’ with stunning views down the River spanning all the way to South Australia.

The group stopped briefly at a cliff top view across the Glenelg River at Killara before a great lunch provided by Richardson’s Butchers at the home of Tim Burnard. This was followed by a visit to the junction of the Glenelg and Wannon Rivers and finally to the site of the rescue at Daley’s Farm during the 1946 floods.

image

As usual, Graeme Baugh led the discussion throughout the day, with plenty of contributions from the audience, and Des Wombwell was there again to record all of the talks.

Tim Burnard, Chairman of Friends of the Glenelg River said that it was a great learning experience hearing the stories from the three days. Graeme’s knowledge of our local history is very impressive and we are very hopeful that he will take us on more tours in the future (after a bit of a rest!).

Tim also said that the group is now compiling all of Graeme’s work and the tapes filmed by Des to ensure that the stories are retained for future reference. Friends of the Glenelg River hope to gather up the stories told and put them into a small publication that can be built upon as we get more detail.

Second history bus tour

Friends of the Glenelg River have just completed their second history bus tour under the guidance of local historian Graeme Baugh.

On Sunday 22 April 2007, over 50 people headed off from Rotary Park to share stories from the past. Last tour looked at the Killara region but this time the focus was on the Wilkin area.

First stop for the tour was at Cawkers Creek (also known as the Nine Mile), followed by a site near the old Heatherlie homestead, the Wilkin School site, a heritage listed site near the Myaring Bridge,  a site associated to Dame Mary Gilmore (now owned by the Munro’s) and finally the Myaring Bridge itself.

image

History tour

While Graeme led the discussion throughout the day, there were plenty of contributions from the assembled group. Tim Burnard, Chairman of Friends of the Glenelg River, said that it’s the contributions from all the long time locals that really make the day great. Many of the people on the trip have relatives dating back to our earliest settlers and they all have pieces of information that add to our combined knowledge of the area.

Friends of the Glenelg River hope to gather up the stories told and put them into a small publication that can be built upon as we get more detail. We hope to be running more history bus tours in the near future.

Past History Bus Tours

On Tuesday 27th Feb 2007, Friends of the Glenelg River held the first ‘History Bus Tour’. About 25 people headed off on the bus with local historian, Graeme Baugh keeping everyone entertained with a range of stories from the past.
First stop was at Norriss lookout, offering spectacular views from atop the Kanawinka fault-line escarpment across to Mount Gambier (about 50km away). Graeme, who has long family ties to the area, led the discussion with contributions from many of the locals present;; notably Des Wombwell.
Second stop was at the new Killara Bridge and then finally on to the old Killara School site. All stops had views of our Glenelg River and the stories ranged from the tragedy of past drownings, to the more humorous tale from over 100 years ago, when the school children ran the teacher out of class.
An output of the day was a map (PDF Download) showing past residents along the river from as far back as 1895, when the river was far more densely populated.
Friends of the Glenelg River hope to gather up the stories told and put them into a small publication that can be built upon as we get more detail. We hope to be running more history bus tours in the near future.

image

The old bridge at Vals farm

image

Graeme at Daleys Farm

history day

Friends history day

Norris Lookout

Norriss lookout

Killara Bridge

Killara Bridge

Previous page: Projects
Next page: Flora and Fauna Guide